General Senses

Helpfulness: 0
Set Details Share
created 4 years ago by shadysmainlady
342 views
updated 4 years ago by shadysmainlady
Grade levels:
College: First year, College: Second year
show moreless
Page to share:
Embed this setcancel
COPY
code changes based on your size selection
Size:
X
Show:
1

What are the four neural structures outside the brain and spinal cord (that make up the PNS)?

Sensory receptors, peripheral nerves, ganglia and efferent nerve endings

2

Define ganglia

Collections of nerve cell bodies

3

Define peripheral nerves

31 pairs of mixed spinal nerves named for the point of issue from the spinal cord

4

What is the function of the PNS?

The PNS provides links to the outside world. It also carries impulses to and from the CNS. And it serves as the communicator via afferent and efferent nerves

5

What is the function and subdivisions of afferent nerves?

Brings sensory information toward the CNS and can be subdivided into somatic and visceral nerves.

6

What is the function and subdivisions of efferent nerves?

Carries motor commands away from the CNS. Can be subdivided into somatic and autonomic nerves.

7

Fight or flight

Sympathetic division

8

Rest and digest

Parasympathetic division

9

Define somatosensory system

The part of the sensory system serving the body wall and limbs

10

What are the 3 types of receptors in the somatosensory system?

Exteroceptors, interoceptors and proprioceptors

11

What happens to a stimulus input as it travels to ward the CNS?

It's processed along the way

12

Where is the stimuli processed?

In the postcentral gyrus

13

What regions of the body does the primary somatosensory cortex receive sensory information from?

Skin, skeletal muscle, joints and tendons

14

What is the somatosensory humunculus?

It's a point-to-point mapping of the body on the brain that represents contralateral sensory input from various body regions. The amount of the brain that's covered by the image in the humunculus is representative of the amount of the brain and location used.

15

What is a sensory receptor?

The interface between the nervous system and the surrounding environment, both interior and exterior to the body.

16

What is the connection between the sensory receptor (in the PNS) and the neuron (in the CNS)?

A labeled line

17

Do sensory receptors pick up every different kind of stimuli?

No, only specific stimuli

18

What is the reaction that's generated by a stimuli?

A nerve impulse

19

How are sensory receptors classified?

Stimulus type, location and structure

20

What do thermoreceptors sense?

Heat and cold

21

What do Meissner's corpuscles sense?

Touch

22

What do nociceptors sense?

Pain

23

What so Pacinian corpuscles sense?

Pressure

24

What are the stimuli that exteroceptors respond to?

Touch, pressure, pain tempurature

25

True/False:
Exteroceptors respond to stimuli inside the body

False. They respond to stimuli outside the body

26

Where do interoceptors provide info about?

Inside the body

27

What do proprioceptors respond to?

Stretch in skeletal muscles, tendons, joints, ligaments and connective tissue coverings of bones and muscles. They also provide info about position and movement of the body

28

What are the various classifications of stimulus type?

Mechanoreceptors, thermoreceptors, chemoreceptors and nociceptors

29

What do mechanoreceptors respond to?

Touch, pressure, vibration and pain

30

What do thermoreceptors respond to?

Changes in temp

31

What do chemoreceptors respond to?

Chemicals, (i.e. smell, taste and changes in blood chemistry)

32

What do nociceptors respond to?

Pain, (i.e. extreme heat or cold, excessive pressure, inflammatory chemicals)

33

What are the two types of simple receptors for general senses?

Non-encapsulated and encapsulated

34

What are the varieties of non-encapsulated nerve endings?

Free nerve endings, tactile (Merkle) discs, hair follicle receptors

35

What are the different types of encapsulated nerve endings?

Meissner's corpuscles, pacinian corpuscle, ruffini corpuscle, muscle spindle and golgi tendon organ

36

Where are free nerve endings found?

The dermis and the epidermis

37

What types of tissues contain free nerve endings?

The epithelia and connective tissues

38

Describe nonencapsulated (free) nerve endings

They are non-myelinated with knoblike distal endings

39

What do thermoreceptors, nociceptors, chemoreceptors and mechanoreceptors all have in common?

They are all nonencapsulated (free) nerve endings

40

What do free nerve endings mostly respond to?

Temperature and pain. some to pressure induced tissue movement and itch.

41

Where are non-encapsulated simple receptors found?

In the stratum basale layer of the epidermis

42

All encapsulated nerve endings consist of...

One or more fiber terminals of sensory neurons enclosed in a connective tissue capsule

43

What do non-encapsulated simple receptors respond to?

Light touch and light pressure.

44

What are the two classifications that fall under non-encapsulated nerve endings?

Mechanoreceptors and exteroceptors


Related pages


microeconomics easydefine formed elementsearnings before extraordinary itemsthe primary function of the large intestine isneuron type found in dorsal hornbile in the small intestinehow many covalent bonds can boron formmajor systemic arteries and veins of the bodyzygote cell divisioncarbon and hydrogen covalent bondanatomy and physiology brain and cranial nervesdescribe viral reproductionphlebotomy final exam test questionshuman anatomy and physiology marieb 10th edition test bankexample of autocrine signalingsentence using neophyteprolactin test preparationweber ear testphotosynthesis thylakoidwaves transform bundleacth stimulates the adrenal cortex to release corticosteroid hormonespnf patternsproduct life cycle of colgate toothpastemesenchymal cells are most commonly found in connective tissuesaddle joint exampletexas governors electionanatomy and physiology coloring workbook reproductive system answersthe illustration of simple cuboidal epithelium ismedical terminology games quizzesexocrine glands ________depression and elevation jointswhich is true of transmission electron microscopesanatomy and physiology final exam reviewsympathetic nervous system tonea vaccine works by ______fibrous joints arecampbell biology textbookwhich of the following types of muscles are striatedwhat does a cardiac physiologist dothe canterbury tales the prologuewhat is the difference between medical asepsis and surgical asepsissuspensory ligaments eyedefine circulatory shockcell physiology worksheetpolaroid tv white screendefine isotonic contractioncharacteristics of pterophytahyponatremia is usually a result of hypotonic hydrationwhat is radiographic densitypro athletes overpaidwww.newworldencyclopedia.orgsheep eye dissection lab sheetwhich of the following is false concerning calciummarketing management kotlersteppe landformliver serosahuman anatomy pelvisdifference between filtrate and urinexanthine bronchodilatorerythropoiesis is stimulated by a kidney derived hormone calledap biology chapter 11 reading guide answershow many oxygen molecules can haemoglobin carrydefine trophoblasthow many neutrons in copperfive major functions of the skeletonempirical formula of mercuric oxidehow many chromosomes are in somatic cellsurine concentration and volume depend on water reabsorption in theprotein containing fluid within lymphatic vesselsthe movement of potassium into an animal cell requiresoutside of living cells viruses aresulfa drugs work on